Archives for posts with tag: historic

The old Metairie Cemetary has an interesting history, but it is also a monumental Social History Museum of New Orleans and its rich past shows off the great wealth it once had. I think it is the most beautiful cemetary in the United States and rivals many European cemeteries. As you walk around there you will find some of the most beautiful sculpture and varied styles of architecture. It began as a racetrack and home of the exclusive Metairie Jockey Club, and it was the most popular racetrack in the country in the 1830’s. Charles T. Howard was refused membership there, as he was considered to be nouvaue riche, owning the first lottery in Louisiana. Howard got his revenge when the Racetrack found themselves in a economic downturn and he bought them and turned the racetrack into a cemetary, supposedly out of spite or so the story goes. You can still see the oval design of the racetrack
Howard died in a horse back accident and is buried there, His mausoleum has a statue of man with his finger to his lips, as if to say shhhh.

More information on the cemetery is here

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photograph by Susan Grissom

photograph by Susan Grissom


photograph

photograph by Susan Grissom

photograph by Susan Grissom

photograph by Susan Grissom

photograph by Susan Grissom

photograph by Susan Grissom

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New Orleans has the oldest continuing running operating streetcar in the world. The St Charles runs all down St Charles Avenue and into Carrolton Street and into the border of the French Quarter into Canal Street. It still has the original mahogany seats, brass fittings and exposed ceiling lights. For a buck and a quarter you can take the best tour of New Orleans and get off and walk around where you want. When I took these photograph I was sitting at a sidewalk cafe on Carrolton Street and trying to shoot quickly, but I think the slight blur adds a nice way of showing the streetcars moving. This was also shot at night which I think adds to the romantic feeing of New Orleans.


photographed by Susan Grissom

You can take the tour yourself here for now.